Home > BLOG 1 > BLOG 1: Puppies Go To Prison to Become Dogs That Save Lives
Puppies Go to Prison to Become Dogs That Save Lives #veterinary #onehealth http://t.co/fxBpVQPuHo— Michael Lairmore (@LairmoreDVMDean) August 2, 2015
//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

BLOG 1: Puppies Go To Prison to Become Dogs That Save Lives
Puppies Go to Prison to Become Dogs That Save Lives #veterinary #onehealth http://t.co/fxBpVQPuHo— Michael Lairmore (@LairmoreDVMDean) August 2, 2015
//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

1. This article is about dogs (Labrador Retrievers) that are taken and trained at the Canine Performance Sciences Program at Auburn University. These dogs are trained primarily to build their strong sense of smell to keep people safe. This will train the dog to sniff out possible bombs, drugs, and other threats to people in a government agency or private firm. For half of that time though, these dogs will spend their time and live in a certain state prison where the inmates that have earned their right to work and interact with the dogs will have the chance and also to enhance socialization and detection skills for them. The article extensively explains dogs innate sense of powerful smelling abilities and how they use them.  I chose this article because I am a dog lover and it is so fascinating to me to read up on how dogs help humans all over the world in so many situations.

2. This article is from an article on The New York Times online, written by Ethan Hauser on July 27th, 2015. The research for these dogs was conducted starting  at the Canine Performance Sciences Program at Auburn University and then was studied in the state prisons. The research was conducted by Auburn in that they first tried to have the dogs live with local foster families, but what ended up happening is that they just became raised like pets, not as dogs to build their strong sense of smell and prepare them for their ultimate job. So, the program leaders decided to place the dogs at Bay Correctional Facility, in Florida in 2004 and the rate of “house-pet” dogs dropped dramatically as these dogs were in a more stringent environment. Auburn now partners with five local prisons in Georgia and Florida because of this and the dogs are able to be trained for what they are meant for.

3. One question I have about the article is why they chose Labradors instead of say, German Shepherds? I know they mentioned in the article that mostly labs are “a breed chosen for its sociability and physical resilience,” are good, but I always thought German Shepherds were the first types of dogs always chosen so it was interesting to me. Another question I had about the article was if any of the inmates were able to keep the dogs after, had they gotten out when the dog was still around, even though they wanted to keep the dog for government or private companies. I would like to think that if a dog and an inmate formed a special and close bond that they wouldn’t just have them taken away from them, or perhaps they could go visit them.

Advertisements
Categories: BLOG 1
  1. September 1, 2015 at 8:56 am

    Good. But embed the tweet in the body of the post not the headline. And shorten your answer to each question by a sentence or two.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: